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Hot Topics

Hot topic: Life in the trenchesIMG_7563-1024x476

Physicists often work in exotic places.  Quantum Diarist Laura Gladstone shares her experiences working deep, deep underground …

Life Underground: Anything Anyone Would Teach Me

Laura Gladstone | Friday, April 17th, 2015, 2015
Going underground most days for work is probably the weirdest-sounding this about this job. At Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, we use the lab to be underground because of the protection it affords us from cosmic rays, weather, and other disruptions, and with it we get a shorthand description of all the weirdness of lab life. It’s all just “underground.”  

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This article appeared in Fermilab Today on April 21, 2015. This weekend, members of the Mu2e collaboration dug their shovels into the ground of Fermilab’s Muon Campus for the experiment that will search for the direct conversion of a muon into an electron in the hunt for new physics. For decades, the Standard Model has

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As long-time readers of Quantum Diaries know I have been publishing here for a number of years and this is my 85th and last post[1]. A couple of years ago, I collected the then current collection, titled it “In Defense of Scientism,” after the title of one of the essays, and sent it off to

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Going underground most days for work is probably the weirdest-sounding this about this job. At Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, we use the lab to be underground because of the protection it affords us from cosmic rays, weather, and other disruptions, and with it we get a shorthand description of all the weirdness of lab

Read the full article

Building a Neutrino Detector

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

Ever wanted to see all the steps necessary for building a neutrino detector? Well now you can, check out this awesome video of constructing the near detector for the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment in France. This is the second of two identical detectors near the Chooz nuclear power station in northern France. The experiment,

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This Fermilab press release came out on April 13, 2015. Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of the cosmos. These maps, created with one of the world’s most powerful digital cameras, are the largest contiguous maps created at this level of detail and will

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The CUORE-0 collaboration just announced a result: a new limit of 2.7 x1024 years (90%C.L.) on the halflife of neutrinoless double beta decay in 130Te. Or, if you combine it with the data from Cuorecino, 4.0×1024 years. A paper has been posted to the arXiv preprint server and submitted to the journal Physical Review Letters. CUORE-0

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This article appeared in Fermilab Today on Thursday, April 9. Imagine an instrument that can measure motions a billion times smaller than an atom that last a millionth of a second. Fermilab’s Holometer is currently the only machine with the ability to take these very precise measurements of space and time, and recently collected data

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While everybody is excited by the coming “phase 2” of the LHC, someone else is already looking beyond it, thinking: “what are the possible future scenarios for our beloved Large Hadron Collider?” The community of “phenomenologists”, theoreticians who like to play with data, closely collaborate with experimentalists to plan new experiments. We are hoping to

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Choose as Many as You Like

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

I want to understand the universe. I want to understand how the universe works. I want to build models of how the universe works that predict the results of experiments. I want to build models of how the universe works that predict the results of experiments, because I believe those models get closer and closer

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This article appeared in Fermilab Today on April 3, 2015. Last month, a new superconducting magnet developed and fabricated at Fermilab reached its design field of 11.5 Tesla at a temperature nearly as cold as outer space. It is the first successful twin-aperture accelerator magnet made of niobium-3-tin in the world. The advancements in niobium-3-tin,

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