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Steve Nahn | USLHC | USA

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A kSteve

As a proud member of Project Steve I am happy to hear and disperse the news that the kiloSteve milestone has been achieved, and in fact Steve #1000 is  Steven P. Darwin, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.  I am somewhere between Steve #200 and Steve #400 chronologically, according to the list of Steves , and joined back when I was at Yale – I have the 400 Steve tshirt to prove it.  As my good friend Steve Hahn (in my same range, probably just before me) was fond of saying:

You get three or more Steves together, and something wonderful happens

It happened a lot back on CDF for a while: There was Steve Chappa, Steve Hahn, Steve Kuhlman, Steve Levy, Steve Miller,  Steve Mrenna,  Steve Nahn, Steve Tether, Steve Vecjik and maybe I’m forgetting one or two, all in near proximity.  It was so dense you couldn’t move without bumping into someone named Steve, not to mention Stefano Belaforte, Stefano Torre, Stefano Moccia, and Stefano Giagu.

And yes, Steve Hahn’s name differs by one letter from mine, which occasionally created fairly humurous results (although he is actually a “ph” where as I am a “v”).  Some day I will relate the story of the two Michael Schmi(d/t)ts, but only in person.  There are two Bob Wagners too, “Argo” Bob, and “Fermi” Bob.  It got kinda surreal.

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4 Responses to “A kSteve”

  1. Didi Mousse says:

    Hah! I love this! I assume that P. Darwin was holding in the wings, just so he could be the kiloSteve, otherwise my brain would boil at the improbability of it (betraying my deterministic-universe bias.) While I agree wholeheartedly with the spirit of this endeavor, I have to say that using phrases like “pedagogically irresponsible” with these folks is akin to selling bicycles to fish. :-)

  2. Seth Zenz says:

    Nice paper: http://improbable.com/pages/airchives/paperair/volume10/v10i4/morph-steve-10-4.pdf

    I’m disappointed to see it’s not on your “selected publications” list!

  3. Haryo says:

    In same spirit of your previous post, it should also be noted scientists with name like Stephanie or their derivaties are also encouraged to join Project Steve !

  4. Steve says:

    Indeed, another CDFer Stephanie Menzemer! Not sure if she joined, but she is certainly welcome. Project Steve is gender blind, although a look through the names with a traditional interpretation of male/female versions of “Steve” shows the problem in the hard sciences once again – the female “Steves” are in quite the minority, although there’s some selection bias, given that it is traditionally a male name (can you think of another female derivation other than “Stephanie”?). Maybe “Pat” would be a better candidate for study…
    For the record, there was Steve Blusk too on CDF. Probably some others, but I can’t spare the memory cells too much on such things.

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