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Jonathan Asaadi | Syracuse University | USA

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Tevatron still kicking butt (or rather proton/antiproton)

I thought I would share this post from the Tevatron’s Facebook page (can be found here).

Just in the last week we had 6 of the top 10 initial luminosity stores from the Tevatron and the accelerator delivered 78 pb-1 of data in just the last week!

This is really an amazing accomplishment for this accelerator and with this rate of data delivery we can be sure that both experiments that operate on the Main Ring (CDF and D0) will have lots of data to analyze before the planned shutdown in September.

For those of you that don’t exactly know what these numbers mean, this is just a simple way of measuring the amount of interactions (or collisions) that we will get during the operation of the accelerator. The higher the luminosity, the greater chance that the collisions will occur and the more interesting data we have to record. What is truly amazing is after 25 years of operations the Tevatron is performing like never before and delivering data and unprecedented rates! This means that there is a greater chance of catching a glimpse at rare processes in physics that may be buried in our data.

Even more clear explanations and updated numbers for the Tevatron can be found here:

http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/tevlum.html

http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/tevlumexp.html

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