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Aidan Randle-Conde | Université Libre de Bruxelles | Belgium

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Higgs seminar discussion

Shortly after the Higgs Seminar, Seth Zenz and I had a short, impromptu discussion about the results and what they mean for physics in the near future. Check out the video:

(Due to a technical problem, we lost the first two seconds of audio, so there is a slightly abrupt start.)

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9 Responses to “Higgs seminar discussion”

  1. David Oker says:

    thanks guys.

    I’m sure there’s more physics even if the standard model is thouroughly proved(experimentaly). So, this is still very exciting!

  2. Thomas Goddard says:

    What happens if it’s a standard model higgs vs. what Seth eluded to Atlas knows (based on their secret data?). So what would a non-standard higgs at 119GeV with some background particle dimension punching look like for the standard model?

    • Seth Zenz says:

      I don’t have any secret data from ATLAS — I was just talking about how their channels split up according to the talks. I don’t have any secrets from CMS, either, because we just released everything we know about the Higgs search!

      I’m not sure what you mean by “background particle dimension punching,” but the point that we were trying to get at is that you can’t exclude there being multiple particles in the range, and that they don’t have to interact with other particles at the same rates as the Standard Model Higgs. That being said, there’s no theory I’m aware of that makes it seem likely that there are actually multiple particles between 115 and 128 GeV.

  3. Thomas Goddard says:

    I assumed that you meant multiple Higgs as a new theory, but I just wanted to make sure that I understood You and Aidan on the 119 GeV part. What I thought you might have been hinting at is a flavor of the Higgs at one energy creating background noise at another energy. I might have imagined Aidan mentioning that some other theorists might get excited about the 119 energy (imagining he meant String Theorists). You gave him a look like he knew something a bit deeper about the data, but was not willing to share. Thank you for taking the time to answer, though. Pretty amazing picture there in the background!

    This blog is amazing by the way! I always come here to get the latest and greatest insight. Thanks again!

    • Hi Tom, thanks for your comment. I don’t have any access to any secret data and neither does Seth! When one of our experiments get an interesting result, and we’ve done our best to explain the result in mundane ways (ie rechecking everything twice, sometimes even running an entirely separate and independent analysis) we’re quick to tell people! I think we were glancing over at each other so much because this conversation was unrehearsed and unscripted. After grabbing a quick snack, we went straight from the seminar to somewhere quieter and more scenic to make this video as quickly as possible, with almost no preparation, so we didn’t know what we were going to say, and we were looking for visual cues.

      The comment I made about getting theorists was not specifically about string theory, and it was more aimed at supersymmetry, which can be used to extend the Standard Model. The Standard Model predicts a single Higgs boson, but the Minimal SuperSymmetric Model (or MSSM) predicts four more states, which include one more scalar Higgs boson, one vector Higgs boson and two charged Higgs bosons. Seeing two scalar particles in the mass region could indicate that we are seeing hints of the MSSM, which would be wonderful news for both theorists and experimentalists! It wouldn’t have to be MSSM, of course, and anything new would be exciting. As Seth hinted, the phrase “Who ordered that?!” is one of our favorites, as it can lead to wonderful areas of new physics.

      The picture in the background is of the CMS detector. The building is full of offices for both ATLAS and CMS, so CMS put up a large mural of their detector on “their” side of the building. Across the atrium it faces many ATLAS offices and the ATLAS Secretariat. I wonder if that was done on purpose…

      I’m glad you like the blog! If you have any comments about what you’d like to see more of I’d be very grateful to hear them. Do you like the video post, or do you prefer textual posts?

  4. Thomas Goddard says:

    Good stuff. I will keep my eye on the blog, and look forward to the next round of tests. The videos are great, but textual can also be great. I find it helpful when something complicated is explained graphically (either through CG or whiteboard). Many readers might find videos on workflow to be very interesting. In addition, here are a few video ideas:

    How are the datasets loaded from the events?
    What is the workflow for capturing and viewing events and what kind of conversations take place when an event occurs?
    Whiteboard sessions on new physics theories, explaining the graphs.
    Closeups of the electronics in the detectors and sensors with some sort of unboxing style commentary.
    Meeting the team members and hearing about and seeing some of their work as you go!

    By the way, is it possible for non-physicists to grab 3D data for the ZZ and PP events discusses from the meeting, and then view them in a 3D app for Linux or Mac? If there is raw vector data with file schema/description, it would be pretty neat to see an importer for desktop applications (just for entertainment).

    Thanks again!

    • Pavel says:

      quoting Thomas:
      How are the datasets loaded from the events?
      What is the workflow for capturing and viewing events and what kind of conversations take place when an event occurs?
      Whiteboard sessions on new physics theories, explaining the graphs.
      Closeups of the electronics in the detectors and sensors with some sort of unboxing style commentary.
      Meeting the team members and hearing about and seeing some of their work as you go!

      and responding to him about the app for visualizing raw data 3d models (but not only), Athena:

      https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/StevenGoldfarbAthena#Introduction

      get the (I truly don’t know if it’s raw) data reading here:

      https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/StevenGoldfarbDQ2

      a quite lot of literature and documentation is waiting you to being read =)

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