• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Flip
  • Tanedo
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Richard
  • Ruiz
  • Univ. of Pittsburgh
  • U.S.A.

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Michael
  • DuVernois
  • Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Jim
  • Rohlf
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Emily
  • Thompson
  • USLHC
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Denis Oliveira Damazio | USLHC | USA

View Blog | Read Bio

How a calorimeter works – part 3

Portuguese text below….

So, in the last two (first and second) posts about how a calorimeter works, I explained how a particle enters in such detectors, loose its energy producing a shower of other particles and finally how this shower provokes the generation of an electrical signal thanks to the “sampling material”. One detail that is important not to forget is that we have a large number of electrodes (hence, calorimeter “cells” – around 187 thousand of them) collecting information on energy deposition in the calorimeter. A good electron shower can be composed of as many as a few hundred cells. For sure it is very important to measure the signal in every cell for every collision event that happens in ATLAS and that is not exactly something very easy to do. Let’s understand how this is done.

First, I propose to watch the left 12 secs video below. It is an extract of the previous videos on how a particle makes the shower inside the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter, but now really focusing in the two important parts necessary to understand the format of the output electric signal. First, you see a particle crossing the lead absorber and producing 3 particles. We follow one of these while it crosses the 2 mm space between the absorber (dark gray bar) and the copper electrode (copper-colored?!), this one with a very positive Voltage (~2000V). This space we call “the gap”. Well, despite the “slowliness” implied by the movie, this particle is very close to the speed of light. This means, that the time to cross the gap is less than 0.01 nanoseconds (that’s 0. followed by 10 zeros before the “1″ appears – compare with the 25 ns of the collisions time). Even if the particle were at 10% the speed of light, that’s still around 0.1 ns, immediate in terms of LHC collisions interval. This phase is called ionization or, Charge Deposition. The electron created all the negative electrons and positive argon ions and disappeared, going to the next cell.

The second part of the signal is the drift of the electrons freed from the argon atoms towards the electrodes. In the last scene of the movie, you will see three long white trails with the electrons drifting from the absorber until the electrode. If you were in the top of a relatively tall building letting some water leak to the floor and, all of a sudden, you cut the flow, people looking at the column of water would still see the top of the water column falling for a few seconds. That’s exactly the same thing, except that instead of water flow we have electrons flow and in the place of gravity we have the electric pull of the electrons by the positive electrode. During sometime (~400 ns), the electrons will be drifting to the electrode and as time goes by you will have less electrons (again, this movie is part of ATLAS episode II – see here the complete part 1 and part 2 of this movie in English!).

Now, let’s see the signal shape. This is in the second movie. First, you got basically no signal (that never exists in electronics – I should say : you got only noise!). Then, the fast electron crosses almost immediately the gap and you get the highest possible signal. The higher the initial electron energy, the higher the number of electrons freed from the argon atoms and the higher is this initial current. So, all we care for measurement purposes would be this initial current peak. The rest of the time the current gets dimmer and dimmer until we got only noise again. When the time scale on the movie changes, you are just seeing the drift moment. Now, in reality you never see this triangle. All you see is the single measurement value and you have to take a decision about when to “catch” the pulse value. Trying to catch too many tens of samples represents an extra load to the electronics usually hitting a power heating or a data amount limitation and you have to be able to sample as least as possible.

The whole thing happens very quickly, so, you have to use some electronic device to find a better way to work this out. Let’s consider the 3 pictures below. The value is the one marked with a star. In the first picture it is obvious that the shot was taken too soon, our artist was not even in the studio. This means we lost the signal (energy measured = noise!). The second picture is the perfect sampling of the signal at the curve peak. If we always could do like that, this would be perfect. However, most of the time, you would be getting the signal after the peak was reached (third picture) and the energy of the cell would be underestimated. This is very bad.

Sampling of the calorimeter signal performed too early

Sampling of the calorimeter signal performed too early

Sampling of a calorimeter pulse taken at the best timing (pulse peak)

Sampling of a calorimeter pulse taken at the best timing (pulse peak)

Sampling of a calorimeter signal taken too late

Sampling of a calorimeter signal taken too late

So, instead of trying to sample the direct signal and certainly making a mistake, we use an electronic circuit that re-shapes the signal. This circuit stretches the fast rising part so that, in the end, the peak value information is distributed over a much longer time spam (something like 125 ns). The shaped pulse is shown in the figure below together with the original pulse. Now, multiple samples (5) at regular time intervals of this structure are acquired by an analogue-to-digital converter circuit which produces digital numbers related to the pulse value at the sampling moment (marked by dots in the shaped pulse). Using these numbers, it is possible to make a best guess (or what one like to call technically a “fit”) of what the shaped pulse really is, including its height, even if the signal is shifted of 1 or 2 ns. And from that, we can calculate the energy in the cell.

LAr Pulse its shaped version and the samples

LAr Pulse its shaped version and the samples

Due to the very long pulse (400 ns) and the very short interval between collisions (25 ns), it is not impossible (rather, highly probable) that a given cell will receive the signal from one collision while the signal from a previous collision is still in the drifting phase. This effect is called pileUp, and we will discuss it in a much later post.

The discussion today involved complex topics in engineering and physics applied to the detector signal. Design of a good stable and cheap shaping filter, sampling the signal at a cost and power effective rate, dealing with pile Up and performing energy calculation are quite general topics and many different detectors use similar techniques. Many of these topics are whole areas of study, specially in engineering. The signals produced by a detector are usually very fast or very slow and the shaping helps to extract their meaningful properties. For instance, for the Tile Calorimeter discussed in the previous post, the whole pulse is very short (a few ns) and you have to completely stretch it, while maintaining the area produced by the original signal (proportional to the light captured).

Now we will stop the section on how a calorimeter works and we will start another one on how the trigger works to select good collisions for Higgs (??) candidates!

Portuguese part :

Nos últimos dois (primeiro e segundo) posts sobre o funcionamento de um calorímetro, expliquei como uma partícula entra em tais detectores, perde sua energia produzindo uma cascata de outras partículas e, finalmente, como essa partícula provoca a geração de um sinal elétrico graças ao material de amostragem. Um detalhe importante é que o enorme número de eletrodos (ou seja, “células” do calorímetro – cerca de 187 mil) coletam a deposição de energia em todo o calorímetro. Uma cascata razoável de elétrons pode ser composta de algumas centenas destas células. Obviamente é muito importante medir o sinal em todas as células para cada evento de colisão que acontece no ATLAS e essa não é uma tarefa tão simples. Vamos entender como isto é feito.

Primeiramente, podemos ver um filme de 12 segundos no quadro abaixo à esquerda. É um pequeno extrato de um dos vídeos que discutimos anteriormente mostrando uma partícula produzindo a cascada no calorímetro de Argônio Líquido do ATLAS, mas agora focando na geração do sinal elétrico. Primeiro, pode-se ver uma partícula cruzando o absorvedor de chumbo e se produzindo 3 partículas. Seguimos uma destas enquanto ela cruza o pequeno espaço de 2 mm entre o absorvedor (barra cinza escura) e o eletrodo de cobre (na cor do cobre, obviamente! ;-) ) que mantém uma Voltagem alta positiva (~2000V). Apesar da lentidão que o vídeo parece implicar, o elétron está praticamente a velocidade da luz, e isso significa que ele cruza o pequeno intervalo em menos de 0.01 nanosegundo (Ou seja, um “0.” seguido de dez zeros antes de aparecer o “1″ – compare com o tempo entre colisões no LHC – 25 ns). Mesmo que fosse um elétron lento (10% da velocidade da luz), ainda teríamos 0.1 ns. Essa fase é chamada de ionização ou Deposição de Carga. O elétron criou todas as cargas negativas e íons positivos dos átomos de Argônio e desapareceu indo para a próxima célula.

A segunda parte do sinal é a tração dos elétrons liberados dos átomos de argônio na direção dos eletrodos. Na última cena do filme, podemos ver os três longos traços brancos relativos aos elétrons atraídos desde o absorvedor até o eletrodo. Se você estivesse no alto de um prédio relativamente alto e observando um vazamento de água até o solo e, de repente, você cortasse o fluxo de água, pessoas observando a coluna de líquido veriam o topo desta coluna demorando alguns segundos até chegar no solo. O efeito é o mesmo para os elétrons, exceto que temos elétrons em vez de água e em vez da força da gravidade temos a atração elétrica do eletrodo positivo!! Durante um certo intervalo de tempo (cerca de 400 ns), os elétrons estarão se dirigindo para o eletrodo e cada vez teremos menos elétrons (Uma vez mais, este filme é parte do Episódio II do ATLAS – veja o filme completo parte 1 e parte 2 deste filme em Inglês).

Agora, vejamos o formato do sinal. Este se encontra no segundo filme. Primeiramente não temos nenhum sinal (isso não existe em eletrônica – eu deveria dizer que só temos ruído!). Então, o elétron rápido cruza praticamente de forma imediata o intervalo e o sinal atinge o seu máximo. Quanto maior a energia do elétron inicial, maior o número de elétrons liberados dos átomos de Argônio e maior é este pico de corrente. Dessa forma, o único valor importante para se realizar a medida da energia é o valor do pico inicial. No resto do tempo, a corrente vai diminuindo lentamente até atingirmos o valor de ruído de novo. Quando a escala de tempo do filme muda, já estamos na parte de tração dos elétrons. Na realidade, o triângulo que se forma no filme não pode realmente ser visto. Tudo o que se vê é o valor a ser medido e temos que tomar a melhor decisão sobre quando realizar a medida. Realizar a medida muitas dezenas de vezes seria o melhor, mas, infelizmente, há um aumento de custo, consumo e dados produzidos, tornando a eletrônica impossível de ser construída. Isso nos leva a tentar capturar o mínimo possível de amostras.

Como a coisa toda acontece muito rapidamente, você tem que usar alguma eletrônica para encontrar uma melhor forma de resolver este problema. Considere as três figuras abaixo. O valor obtido é marcado com uma estrela. No primeiro desenho está claro que a “foto” foi tirada muito cedo, tendo o artista ainda nem entrado na sala. Isso significa que perdemos o sinal (energia medida = nível de ruído!!). No segundo desenho vemos a amostragem perfeita, exatamente no pico. Entretanto, na maior parte das vezes, só conseguimos medir o sinal depois que o pico foi atingido (terceira figura) e a energia da célula fica sub-estimada. Obviamente, isso não é muito bom.

Sampling of the calorimeter signal performed too early

Colhendo a amostra do sinal do Calorímetro muito cedo

Sampling of a calorimeter pulse taken at the best timing (pulse peak)

Colhendo a amostra do sinal do Calorímetro no momento certo (pico de sinal)

Sampling of a calorimeter signal taken too late

Colhendo a amostra do sinal do Calorímetro muito tarde

Para se resolver esse problema, em vez de tentar medir amostras do sinal direto e, quase sempre fazer uma medida errada, usamos um circuito eletrônico que modifica a forma do sinal. Este circuito estica a parte relativa à subida rápida do pulso, “espalhando” a informação num período de tempo bem mais longo (cerca de 125ns). O pulso assim reformatado aparece na figura abaixo junto com o pulso original. Agora, diferentes amostras (5) a intervalos regulares desta estrutura podem ser adquiridas por um circuito que faz a conversão analógico pra digital, produzindo números relativos ao valor do pulso a cada amostra (marcados como pontos no sinal reformatado). Usando estes números, é possível se obter uma “melhor estimativa” (tecnicamente chamada de um “fit”) do que o pulso formato realmente é, incluindo o seu pico, mesmo que o sinal esteja ligeiramente deslocado de 1 ou 2 ns. A partir dessa informação, podemos calcular a energia da célula.

O Pulso do Calorímetro, seu sinal reformatado e suas amostras

O Pulso do Calorímetro, seu sinal reformatado e suas amostras

Como o pulso físico é muito longo (400 ns) e o intervalo entre colisões é bastante curto (25 ns), não é impossível (e na verdade é muito provável) que uma certa célula receba o sinal de uma colisão enquanto o sinal da colisão anterior ainda esta na fase de atração dos elétrons. Este efeito é chamado de empilhamento (PileUp) e discutiremos ele num post futuro.

A discussão de hoje envolveu tópicos complexos em engenharia e física aplicadas ao sinal do detector. O design de um filtro de formatação do sinal estável e barato, amostragem do sinal de forma eficiente em termos de custo e potência utilizada, lidar com o efeito de empilhamento e executar rapidamente o cálculo de energia são tópicos muito gerais e técnicas similares são utilizadas em diferentes detectores. Muitos destes tópicos são áreas inteiras de estudo, especialmente em engenharia. Os sinais produzidos pelos detectores são, normalmente, muito rápidos ou muito lentos e a reformatação ajuda muito a extrair as propriedades realmente importantes. Por exemplo, o Calorímetro de Telhas que discutimos no post anterior tem um sinal rápido demais e a reformatação estica o mesmo enquanto mantém a área sob a curva que é proporcional à energia (proporcional à luz capturada!).

Agora nós vamos fazer uma pausa na seção sobre o funcionamento do calorímetro e vamos começar a discutir o funcionamento do sistema de seleção chamado de Trigger. Este sistema foi responsável por escolher os bons eventos candidatos a Higgs!

Aproveito pra re-anunciar o canal ATLAS/Brasil, agora com uma página melhorada e com mais 9 vídeos :
http://atlas-live-public.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-public/brazil/index.html

Share

4 Responses to “How a calorimeter works – part 3”

  1. Gerard says:

    This calorimeter series has been one of the best blog entries i have read all year. An excellent contribution. Thanks.

  2. [...] Como um calorímetro funciona, parte 1 Como um calorímetro funciona, parte 2 Como um calorímetro funciona, parte 3 [...]

  3. This 3-part calorimeter series was fantastic! It even inspired me to begin a Pinterest board, featuring each entry.

    I found the use of an analog to digital signal converter, in part 3, to be especially ingenious. I guess it is obvious that I like the idea of enduring relevance: From classical physics (a Burns calorimeter) to the EM calorimeter and finally, the Hadronic! I need to re-read the entire series to understand fully, as I am still enamored of the concepts and wonderful visuals. Thank you so much, Denis Demazio of CERN!

Leave a Reply

Commenting Policy