Comments on: Huge impact from a tiny decay http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/ Thoughts on work and life from particle physicists from around the world. Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:23:00 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 By: Here http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-139984 Mon, 29 Jul 2013 01:05:05 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-139984 Interesting article cern, and great results. It’s like I’m back to quantum mechanics class in the university. You guys are so lucky to have a chance to work in this team. Whereas in our country the physics is neither dead or alive 😉

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By: LHC está matando a supersimetria - Noticias em tempo real http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-95304 Thu, 22 Nov 2012 11:43:08 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-95304 […] Quantum Diaries, […]

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By: CERN http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-95145 Wed, 21 Nov 2012 08:47:27 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-95145 Glad you liked it and thanks for letting me know. Indeed, there is more to CERN than just the Higgs but that one has been the most popular in the media. I am always happy to cover other topics and this one from LHCb was hard to pass by… Such an important and far reaching measurement. I’ll make sure to keep a balance, thanks for the reminder.

Cheers, Pauline

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By: Pablo http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-95048 Tue, 20 Nov 2012 20:48:46 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-95048 Congrats for the article, quite nice one!
I was missing some flavour physics besides so much Higgs! 😛

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By: CERN http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-94553 Sat, 17 Nov 2012 13:29:20 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-94553 Glad you liked the article, Marcel.
Indeed, this is a major accomplishment. Theorists like Nazila Mahmoudi are convinced that this new result will help open new doors contrary to what has been said in some places (i.e. interpreting this result as the end of supersymmetry). I am hoping to have a discussion with her next week and report on her thoughts for the next steps and the implication of this results in a week or two. It might take time but something new will show up. The resilience of the Standard Model is also telling us something (not quite sure yet what it is though).

Cheers, Pauline

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By: Marcel van Velzen http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-94552 Sat, 17 Nov 2012 13:22:57 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-94552 Dear Pauline,

Great article as usual.

What an astonishing accomplishment by CERN and especially the LHCb team.
I personally believe that this experimental confirmation of the Standard Model prediction of the tiny Bs branching ratio to two muons is as important as the discovery of the HIggs particle.

Congratulations!

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By: CERN http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-94314 Thu, 15 Nov 2012 12:48:56 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-94314 Hello, a particle accelerator does not create energy or matter out of nothing. If you are not convinced, take a look at CERN electricity bill! The energy put out by the accelerator, the LHC, comes from something else. All the LHC does is to allow concentrating this energy in one tiny spot, and then this energy can materialize in the shape of new particles. Lavoisier’s principle still holds: “Nothing is created, nothing is lost, everything is transformed”. In this sense, you are right, a black hole is also a particle accelerator. The extremely large gravitational fields it generates can accelerate particles and when they will collide with each other, form new particles. So it is just a transformation of gravitational energy into matter, not the creation of matter out of nothing.

Now, if I or anybody else knew the answer to your second question about dark matter, we would stop wondering about the nature of dark matter and dark energy. As far as I understand it, the presence of dark matter means the gravitational fields are much larger than if there was only ordinary matter 9the part that we see, stars and galaxies). This gives extra gyroscopic or rotational energy to the ordinary matter, which is in fact, how the presence of dark matter was discovered. So I think it works in the other direction. I hope this helps you a bit. Of course, if we knew what dark matter is I could provide a much better answer…

Cheers, Pauline

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By: m lyttle, http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/11/14/huge-impact-from-a-tiny-decay/#comment-94128 Wed, 14 Nov 2012 13:58:55 +0000 http://www.quantumdiaries.org/?p=26687#comment-94128 hi everyone at cern, black holes, is it accptable a theory that they produce mass and matter, since they are in themselves particle accelorators, and also dark matter, is this possibly gyroscopic energy, or simple magnetic force produced by the gravity of planets in the universe. how long away are we from finding if we live in a universe that lives beside nieghbouring universes

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