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Jonathan Asaadi

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Jonathan Asaadi

Going to meetings, doing office work, taking shifts, seeing friends, and trying to survive a stressful life; these are all things that take up our days and fill our lives with different experiences. Just like everyone else, I partake in having these same tasks, however I do them in the context of particle physics and acting as a young scientist in the first years of my post-doctoral training. I feel very lucky to get to partake in the life of a scientist and feel fortunate to be at this place in my journey. It is this feeling that has led me to share some of my stories through this blog.

I am a post-doc with Syracuse University and am in the first of, what I hope to be, many years participating in the neutrino experiments at Fermilab. I currently am living neart Fermilab and am participating with the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Neutrino experiment.

I share a deep appreciation of how very lucky I am to be doing something I love. I count myself fortunate to share these experiences with the wonderful and interesting people at Fermilab, and the wish to give back to the physics community and broader society that has given us so much.

Maybe through this blog I can help ignite some people’s interest in the research that is performed at Fermilab (and many other labs like this) and offer a glimpse into the lives of the scientists and engineers who help shape our understanding of the universe.

But even more, we hope to give a brief glimpse into the times outside our research, so that the wider community can link in and share the things that we all do as people, we just happen to get to do them at the most complicated experiment ever conceived of by mankind with some of the smartest and most talented people on the globe :)