• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Junpei Fujimoto | KEK | Japan

View Blog | Read Bio

Quantification

Hi, Tony. Thank you very much for your comment for ‘Japan on the globe’. Yes, surely we should remember the effects from ancient Greeks and ancient Egypt, so on. Here I would like to say physics consists of two steps;

  1. Quantify the phenomena and book numbers.
  2. Analyze the structure behind numbers.
Ticho Brahe's notebook

Tycho Brahe's notebook

In the 16th cent., Tycho Brahe accumulated the data on movement of Mars for 16 years!! Then with this data, Johannes Kepler got ‘Kepler’s Three Laws of Planetary Motion’.

Kepler’s insight from data to the laws was marvelous which led the theory of gravity of Newton. But I am also quite interested in quantification of Tycho. The accuracy of his data were within 1 arc-minute if referred by fixed stars, within 2 arc-minute in usual and within 4 arc-minute on the location of planets. It was so accurate when compared with the case of Copernicus, who was satisfied if his theory agreed with data in 10 arc-minute.

European seems to have tradition to respect to accumulate piles of numbers since those days. In the case of Japanese, we might prefer composing a poem for admiring its beautyof Mars or holding the tea ceremony under the sky. There is still tendency for Japanese to feel quantification to be less humanity, though it is a key step to do Physics.

こんにちは、トニーさん。「地球における日本」にコメントしてくれて有難う。
ええ、そうですね、古代ギリシアや古代エジプト文明などからの影響はとても重要ですね。
今回は物理学を進める上で必要となる2つの段階について触れようと思います。それは、

1) 数量化(データベース化)
2) 抽象化(法則化)

の2段階です。

16世紀、デンマークのチコ・ブラーエはなんと、16年間も火星の動きを詳しくノートに記録
しました。そのデータを解析して、ヨハネス・ケプラーは有名な「惑星運動に関する3つの
法則」を導きました。

チコの残した膨大な数字の羅列から法則を導きだした、このケプラーの洞察には驚くべきも
のがあり、その後、この3法則を説明するために、ニュートンの重力理論が生まれ近代物理
学の創始となっていきます。でも、私としては、そのきっかけとなったチコ・ブラーエの行
った自然現象の「数値化」の重要性に目を向けたいと思います。チコ・ブラーエの観測は恒
星を基準に測定した時は角度にして1分の誤差、通常は2分、惑星の位置に関しては4分とい
った高精度なものでした。コペルニクスが10分の精度での一致で満足していたのにくらべ、
各段の精度を誇っています。しかもその観測は裸眼だったのです。

ヨーロッパでは、そのころから「数値化」の重要性を認識していたことと思います。日本なら
さしずめ、火星を題材に俳句をひねるか、お茶会を開いて眺めるといったことでしょう。まだ
まだ日本では、「数値化」とか「数字の列」とかを人間味がないと敬遠する向きがあります。
でも、この数値化こそが、物理学にとって重要なステップなんです。

Share