• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Junpei Fujimoto | KEK | Japan

View Blog | Read Bio

Quantification 3 —the case of mine —

from edge of KEK territory

from the edge of KEK territory

Why don’t you visit KEK now? You can appreciate full cherry blossoms here. I have, however, never counted the number of them. What do I usually quantify in my physics research? As written, the accelerator experiments supply us the particle reactions and physicists count the number of events etc.. In order to compare with results from experiments, I make quantification of the formulas from the theory, which are usually presented in symbolic expressions. As we, human-beings, don’t have enough mathematics, yet, quantification just can be achieved step by step.

First, we get a rough number from the formulas with some approximation. Please remember the number from experiments also has an error in measurement. If you count the number of events as 100, then you have an error in 10% to conclude something from this observation. In this case, it is not hard to get numbers by means of the first approximation.

But if you have 10,000 events from experiments, you can talk about this phenomenon in 1% level. So we have to step further to the second approximation against this precision, which means the number of formulas to evaluate becomes increased and complicated. Traditionally this step is called ‘radiative corrections’. Because it is beyond the calculation by hand, we need the power of computers.

In the LEP experiments of electron and positron collision held at CERN in 90’s, the experiments accumulated more than 1,000,000 events in each process of particle reactions, of which accuracy reached to 0.1%!  Physicists needed predictions from the theory accurate enough . After a lot of efforts were paid by the physicists in the world, the weak-force part of the standard model was established precisely, at last.

KEKに、今来ていただくと、満開の桜を楽しんでいただけます。物理は数えることから始まると書きました。さすがに桜の花の数を数えたことはありません。が、私は普段何を数値化しているのでしょう?加速器を用いた実験は、素粒子反応を作り出し、物理学者はそのイベントの数を数えることをするわけです。私がやっていることは、その実験結果から得られた数字と比較するために、理論の公式を用いて対応する数字を計算することです。理論は式で表現されているだけなので、式から数字を出すことは結構厄介です。というのも、今人類が持っている「数学」に限界があるので、少しずつ、正確な数字を計算していく方法しかとれないからです。

まず最初は、ある近似法を使って公式から大雑把な数字を計算します。ここで注意していただきたいのは、実験から得られる数字にも、測定に関わる誤差がついているということです。もし、100個のイベントしか勘定できなかったならば、その観測から何か結論付けても、それはきっと10%程の誤差を持っているということです。まあ、この場合は、第1次近似と呼ばれる方法で計算するので、そんなに難しいことではありません。

ところが、もし実験により1万個のイベントを集めたとします。そのとき、その現象に関しては1%の精度で議論を行うことができるようになります。すると、その精度に対応するためには理論計算のほうも、もう一段上の第2次近似という計算をしないといけません。この計算は扱う公式の数が約100倍に増え、しかもその複雑さも増すことになり、とても紙と鉛筆で計算できるものではなくなるので、計算機の力を使うことになります。通常、この第2次以上の近似計算は「輻射補正計算」と呼ばれています。

90年代にCERNで行われたLEPという電子と陽電子を衝突させた実験では、それぞれの素粒子反応を100万イベント以上集めました。したがってその測定精度は0.1%に及びます。この精度を十分上回る理論計算が必要とされました。世界中の数多くの物理学者たちが多大な努力を払って計算を行い、その結果、標準理論と呼ばれる素粒子の理論の、特に弱い力の部分を決定づけることができたのです。

Share