• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Junpei Fujimoto | KEK | Japan

View Blog | Read Bio

Quantification 4 — not enough —

Title page of “Discorsi e Dimostrazioni Mathematiche” in 1638

Title page of “Discorsi e Dimostrazioni Mathematiche” in 1638

Before closing a series of “Quantification”, I have to say the quantification is not enough to study physics, of course. A good example is Einstein’s theory of relativity. As often your reading the text book, there are Galilei’s relativity principle and Einstein’s relativity one. The latter is finite light-velocity version of the former.

In the book by Galilei, “Discorsi e Dimostrazioni Mathematiche” in 1638, he even proposed to measure the speed of light using the distance of two mountains, but light was too fast to get the value. Ole Christensen Romer, a Danish astronomer, in 1676 made the first quantitative measurements of the speed of light to use a satellite of Jupiter, of which value was 214300km/s. Romer’s result that the velocity of light was finite was not fully accepted until measurements of the aberration of light were made by James Bradley in 1727, of which value was 299042km/s. In 1849, Armand Hippolyte Louis Fizeau, a French physicist, got the value 315300±500km/s on the ground to use a special apparatus with gears.In 1862, Jean Bernard Leon Foucault, a French physicist, got 298000±500km/s with mirrors system.

We can see the quantification of the speed of light was already well done in the middle of 19th cent. Light was also identified as the electro-magnetic wave from its value of the speed. Nobody, however, realized it had a special meaning that light had finite speed. Maxwell’s equations of the electromagnetism obeys the version of the relativity principle with the finite speed of light, but Newton’s eq. of motion does not! This observation caused Einstein to postulate the speed of light in free space is the same for all observers. It was leap to the modern physics. So the quantification is indispensable but not enough to reach to physics.

The first part of the paper on the theory of special relativity by Einstein, Annalen der Physik, 17(1905)

The first part of the paper on the theory of special relativity by Einstein, Annalen der Physik, 17(1905)

物理における「数値化」の重要性シリーズを終える前に、「数値化」だけでは不十分であることは
当然なので、例をあげておこうと思います。それはまさにアインシュタインの相対性理論がそうなのです。
よく本などでガリレオの相対性原理とアインシュタインの相対性原理というものが出てきますが、
その違いは、光が無限に速いか、有限の速度を持つと考えるかの違いです。

ガリレオは1638年の「新科学対話」の中で、光の速度を測る実験を提案しています。それは遠くに離れた山の頂上の一方で、光をつけたり消したりすることで、もう一方の人がその時間差から光の速度を測ろうというものでした。当然、光の速度は速すぎて、値は得られませんでした。その後、デンマーク人で天文学者であったレーマーが1676年に木星をまわる衛星イオの見え方から人類史上初めて光の速度を測定し、214300km/秒であるとしました。この光の速度が有限であるという結果は1727年にブラッドレイが光路差を使い、その速度が299042km/秒であるとの測定がなされるまで、完全には受け入れられませんでした。1849年にはフランスの物理学者フィゾーが歯車の回転を使った装置を考案し、それまでは天体の観測によってしか測られていなかった光速度が地上で初めて測定されることとなり、その値は315300+/-500km/秒と、また、同じくフランスの物理学者であったフーコーが鏡を使った実験により、298000+/-500km/秒であるとしています。

このように、19世紀の半ばにはすで光速度の数値化は十分できていました。そして、その値から光の正体が
電磁波であることもわかってきていたのです。ところが誰も光が有限な速度を持つことの真の意味を理解
していませんでした。電磁気学をあらわすマックスウェルの方程式は光速度が有限である相対性原理を
満たしていましたが、ニュートンの運動方程式は依然としてガリレイの相対性原理を満たす方程式で
しかありませんでした。この差に気がついたアインシュタインは、異なる速度で動いている慣性系であろうと、光の速度は変わらないことを原理とした「特殊相対性理論」を作りあげます。そして
これこそが、20世紀現代物理学への跳躍となったのです。「数値化」は必要なのですが、真理に到達
するには、それだけでは十分ではない良い例でした。

Share