• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Junpei Fujimoto | KEK | Japan

View Blog | Read Bio

1729

S. Ramanujan

S. Ramanujan( from http://www.math.rochester.edu/u/faculty/doug/)

I was asked by a friend of mine to read the blog to give him an example that numbers are interesting. It reminds me a very famous episode of S. Ramanujan, who was an Indian mathematician in the early 20th cent. He found tremendous numbers of mathematical formulas or relationships among numbers. When he was in the bed of a hospital, an English mathematician, G.H. Hardy visited his room, and said that he took a taxi of which plate number was 1729, and that this number was quite trivial one. But Ramanujan immediately answered that 1729 was quite interesting one, because it was the minimum number which could be presented by the sum of two cubic numbers in two ways, as follows;

1729 = 12^3 + 1^3 = 10^3 + 9^3.

It is natural to have a question why Ramanujan so quickly remembered 12^3=1728. Those days, Fermat’s Last Theorem, relating to cubic numbers, was one of the center problems among mathematicians. So it is not so strange, in some sense.

sm_feynman

R.P. Feynman( photo by Magnus Waller)

This question is, however, solved by R.P. Feynman who was an American physicist, establishing the theory of electron and photon, quantum electrodynamics(QED) in the middle of 20th cent. Almost the same number appears in the book, ‘Surely you are joking, Mr. Feynman!’ That number is 1729.03.

At a restaurant in Brazil, Feynman had to compete against a Japanese who was very good at counting on the abacus. The problem was to calculate cubic root of 1729.03. Feynman immediately remembered 1728 = 12^3 because a cubic foot is 1728 cubic inches. Then Feynman used Taylor expansion to get better accurate solution, 12.002, before the Japanese got a result with his abacus. We, Japanese, do not use inch-feet system. But we can learn from this story that 1 foot is 12 inches! I wonder a large fraction of Europeans or Americans must know well about 1728=12^3.

But it was just Ramanujan who realized 1729 had such an interesting nature. Especially it is not trivial to prove 1729 is the minimum one. In this context, it is natural to agree with another English mathematician, J.E. Littlewood to say “Every positive integer is one of Ramanujan’s personal friends”.

このブログを読んでくださっている知り合いの方から、数字に関する面白い話はありますか?と聞かれました。それで思い出したのが、20世紀前半に活躍したインドの数学者のラマヌジャンのとても有名は話です。彼は次々と新しい公式や、数の関係を証明無しで量産しました。彼が入院していたとき、彼をイギリスに呼んだ数学者のハーディが見舞いに訪れたときの話です。ハーディの乗ったタクシーのナンバーが1729で、なんということもない数だね、と言ったところ、ラマヌジャンは直ちに、1729は2通りの仕方で2つの立方数の和となっている最小の数という面白い数です。と答えたというのです。

1729=12^3+1^3=10^3+9^3.

この話で思うのは、ラマヌジャンは何故12^3=1728を憶えていたのだろう、ということです。ただ当時は立方数に関係のあるフェルマーの最終定理がまだ証明されておらず、ラマヌジャンもいろいろと計算していたということなので、憶えていてもそんなに奇妙ではないということはあります。

ところが、この疑問に答えていたのが、20世紀に活躍したアメリカの物理学者、ファインマンでした。彼は電子と光の量子力学、量子電磁気学(QED)を構築した一人として有名です。その彼の著書「ご冗談でしょ、ファインマンさん!」の中で、ほとんど同じ数のエピソードがでてきているのです。彼の本の中での数は、1729.03なのですが。

ファインマンがブラジルのとあるレストランで食事を取ろうとしたとき、そのレストランにいた算盤がたいへん得意な日本人と計算の競争をする羽目になります。その計算問題とは、1729.03の立方根をどちらが早く計算できるか?といった競争でした。ファインマンはすぐに、1立方フィートが1728立方インチであることを思い出し、その答えが12に近いはずとし、より正確な答えを求めるために、テイラー展開により補正を計算し、算盤の名人よりも素早く12.002を求めたのでした。我々日本人はインチやフィートを使っていないので知らないのは当たり前なのですが、この話から、1フィートが12インチであることがわかります。つまり、ヨーロッパやアメリカの人にとっては12の3乗が1728であることはよく知られていることなのでは、ということなのです。

しかし、逆に言えば、12の3乗が1728ということが知られていても、1729が面白い数だと最初にきがついたのはラマヌジャンだったということです。特に、1729がそういった性質をもつ最小の数であることを示すのは結構厄介です。この1729のエピソードを聞いたハーディの友人で、やはり数学者のリトルウッドは「どの正の整数もまことにラマヌジャンの親友のようなものだな」と言ったということに素直にうなずけます。

Share