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Koji Hashimoto | Osaka univ. | Japan

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Papers out.

I have submitted two papers on the same date, last week: one is about a gravitational dual of a tachyon condensation, and the other is about a baryon mass shift in QCD by quark masses. These two papers are completely unrelated with each other. Well, to be precise, both papers are on gauge/string duality, so in that sense they are related, but the motivation for these researches are very different. The former is (personally) for a possible reconcilation of two nonperturbative dafinitions of string theory, the gauge/string duality and the tachyon condensation. The latter is an application of the duality for seeing a hadron physics in strongly coupled QCD. The reason why I submitted the papers on the same date, is purely eventual. In fact, the former collaboration with Gary Gibbons and Shinji Hirano, started almost 4 years ago when I lived in Cambridge. The latter, with Taka Hirayama and Deog-Ki Hong,  started last year.

I tried to compute the “mathematical probability” of submission of papers of my projects on a same date, but I couldn’t get a reasonable answer. The period of research project varies, and it is not just a matter of 1/dates used for the research. And I actually prefer not to submit my paper on Tuesday (I mean, the papers appearing on Tuesday in Japanese Standard Time), becuase every Tuesday there appear too many papers and I don’t want my papers to be just one among too many.

Anyway, I like to thank my collaborators: the works are quite nice and I am very satisfactory with the results. If you are interested in the AdS/CFT correspondence, please take a look! I’ve got several e-mails just after the submission, and I am quite happy with them.

Last week was a silent week for me. I come to RIKEN every day and I sat on my desk, did calculations, chat with my colleagues, and I am now writing this blog. I had not so much progress on my research from the view point of the amount of the calculations, but this silence is very important for developping  research ideas. I’ve got several invitations to some meetings, and fixed dates of visiting schedules in the near future. The silence of the last week, and possibly the coming week, should be important, in view of the dense schedule coming by….

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