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Michael DuVernois | Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center | USA

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IceCube looking at the solar event

The largest solar storm in years is approaching the Earth. IceCube is interesting in that, even though the primary goals are at much higher energies, there is a subgroup within the project utilizing the surface detector component of the IceCube Experiment for solar physics. It gives some nice tools for watching the solar energetic particle fireworks. The IceTop summary. This is usually a day behind so the big effects have yet to appear as of this writing. The neutron monitor data are usually in near real time (a few minutes). The main page for the Bartol Neutron Monitors.

In more detail you can see the event really setting in at this link. (The shock is really sweeping the cosmic rays out of the inner solar system.) This link gives a more complete picture of what the cosmic ray anisotropy is doing. The process is applicable to particles up to perhaps 100 GeV. At present we do not think we are seeing with IceCube any freshly accelerated solar particles at GeV energy. But stay tuned…

Thanks to Paul Evenson for the links. This is quite a distance from what most people consider particle physics, but it is an interesting, real-time phenomena.

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