• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Junpei Fujimoto | KEK | Japan

Read Bio

Quantification 3 —the case of mine —

Friday, April 10th, 2009
from edge of KEK territory

from the edge of KEK territory

Why don’t you visit KEK now? You can appreciate full cherry blossoms here. I have, however, never counted the number of them. What do I usually quantify in my physics research? As written, the accelerator experiments supply us the particle reactions and physicists count the number of events etc.. In order to compare with results from experiments, I make quantification of the formulas from the theory, which are usually presented in symbolic expressions. As we, human-beings, don’t have enough mathematics, yet, quantification just can be achieved step by step.

First, we get a rough number from the formulas with some approximation. Please remember the number from experiments also has an error in measurement. If you count the number of events as 100, then you have an error in 10% to conclude something from this observation. In this case, it is not hard to get numbers by means of the first approximation.

But if you have 10,000 events from experiments, you can talk about this phenomenon in 1% level. So we have to step further to the second approximation against this precision, which means the number of formulas to evaluate becomes increased and complicated. Traditionally this step is called ‘radiative corrections’. Because it is beyond the calculation by hand, we need the power of computers.

In the LEP experiments of electron and positron collision held at CERN in 90’s, the experiments accumulated more than 1,000,000 events in each process of particle reactions, of which accuracy reached to 0.1%!  Physicists needed predictions from the theory accurate enough . After a lot of efforts were paid by the physicists in the world, the weak-force part of the standard model was established precisely, at last.

KEKに、今来ていただくと、満開の桜を楽しんでいただけます。物理は数えることから始まると書きました。さすがに桜の花の数を数えたことはありません。が、私は普段何を数値化しているのでしょう?加速器を用いた実験は、素粒子反応を作り出し、物理学者はそのイベントの数を数えることをするわけです。私がやっていることは、その実験結果から得られた数字と比較するために、理論の公式を用いて対応する数字を計算することです。理論は式で表現されているだけなので、式から数字を出すことは結構厄介です。というのも、今人類が持っている「数学」に限界があるので、少しずつ、正確な数字を計算していく方法しかとれないからです。

まず最初は、ある近似法を使って公式から大雑把な数字を計算します。ここで注意していただきたいのは、実験から得られる数字にも、測定に関わる誤差がついているということです。もし、100個のイベントしか勘定できなかったならば、その観測から何か結論付けても、それはきっと10%程の誤差を持っているということです。まあ、この場合は、第1次近似と呼ばれる方法で計算するので、そんなに難しいことではありません。

ところが、もし実験により1万個のイベントを集めたとします。そのとき、その現象に関しては1%の精度で議論を行うことができるようになります。すると、その精度に対応するためには理論計算のほうも、もう一段上の第2次近似という計算をしないといけません。この計算は扱う公式の数が約100倍に増え、しかもその複雑さも増すことになり、とても紙と鉛筆で計算できるものではなくなるので、計算機の力を使うことになります。通常、この第2次以上の近似計算は「輻射補正計算」と呼ばれています。

90年代にCERNで行われたLEPという電子と陽電子を衝突させた実験では、それぞれの素粒子反応を100万イベント以上集めました。したがってその測定精度は0.1%に及びます。この精度を十分上回る理論計算が必要とされました。世界中の数多くの物理学者たちが多大な努力を払って計算を行い、その結果、標準理論と呼ばれる素粒子の理論の、特に弱い力の部分を決定づけることができたのです。

Share

Quantification 2 — the case of particle physics —

Sunday, April 5th, 2009

As in previous my blog, the quantification is the first step of physics. What do modern particle physicists quantify? I put two pictures. I think you see these kinds of ones often. Those show the tracks of particles produced by the accelerator, so called ‘events’. Elementary particles are so tiny, then we can’t see them directly but we have technology to observe where they passed through.

Japan's first bubble chamber, built by KEK, tracked production of two pairs of electron-positron.Image credit : KEK

Japan's first bubble chamber, built by KEK, tracked production of two pairs of electron-positron.Image credit : KEK

The first picture was taken early in 70’s at KEK with the bubble chamber. The bubble chamber was designed as follows; when particles pass through the low pressured liquid hydrogen, particles initiate to create foams. Connecting foams, we can recognize tracks of particles by eyes. One often called this kind of pictures ‘cosmic dances’.

The second picture is an event figure taken by Belle from KEK, which shows the reaction after the collision of electron and positron of KEKB. Contrary of using the bubble chamber, this event was not observed by eyes, but was taken as the digital signal and was reconstructed using the computer.

Particle physicists accumulated this kind of events as much as possible like Tycho. Essentially they count not only the number of events but also get distributions of the direction, momentum and energy of scattered particles, which can be predicted with the theory. The theory contains the knowledge of all nature of particles and strength of forces between particles. If observed numbers and distributions are consistent with the prediction of the theory, then we can judge the theory is right or not.

Example of a fully reconstructd evrnt in the Belle detector.Image credit : KEK

Example of a fully reconstructd evrnt in the Belle detector.Image credit : KEK

前回述べましたように、数値化が物理学の第一歩です。では現代の素粒子物理学者はなにを数値化しているのでしょう?ここに2枚の絵があります。どこかで見たことがある絵ではないでしょうか?これらの図には加速器によって生成された素粒子の軌跡が描かれています。こういった図を「イベント図」と呼んでいます。素粒子というのはとても小さいのでもちろん目で見ることはできないのですが、その素粒子が通っていった跡を観測する技術があるのです。

一枚目の図は70年代のKEKの泡箱という装置で撮られたものです。泡箱では圧力の下げられた液体水素の中に加速器からの素粒子が入ってくると、それをきっかけにその素粒子の通った軌跡に沿って泡が生じます。その細かい泡のつながりが目でみえるようになります。当時はこうした泡箱による素粒子の軌跡図を「コスミックダンス」と呼ぶこともありました。

2枚目の図はKEKB加速器による電子と陽電子の衝突によって生じた素粒子反応をベル測定器によって捉えたイベント図です。泡箱のイベント図と異なり、これは直接目で見えたのではありません。ベルは巨大なデジカメと同じで、軌跡の情報を電子信号として記録し、計算機による解析により、軌跡を再構成することによって描かれたものです。

素粒子物理学者はこうしたイベントをチコ・ブラーエがしたようにできるかぎり多くしかも精密に集めます。そしてそのイベントの数を勘定します。また数だけでなく、記録した粒子がどこをどんな運動量とエネルギーを持って通り過ぎたのかといった分布も記録します。こうして記録したイベントの数や粒子の分布は理論によって予測することができます。理論にはすべての素粒子の性質や素粒子の間に働く力の大きさが考慮されているので、もし、実験から得られた生じたイベントの数や分布が理論の計算値とが一致していればその理論で考えた素粒子の性質は正しいということになるわけです。

Share

Quantification

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Hi, Tony. Thank you very much for your comment for ‘Japan on the globe’. Yes, surely we should remember the effects from ancient Greeks and ancient Egypt, so on. Here I would like to say physics consists of two steps;

  1. Quantify the phenomena and book numbers.
  2. Analyze the structure behind numbers.
Ticho Brahe's notebook

Tycho Brahe's notebook

In the 16th cent., Tycho Brahe accumulated the data on movement of Mars for 16 years!! Then with this data, Johannes Kepler got ‘Kepler’s Three Laws of Planetary Motion’.

Kepler’s insight from data to the laws was marvelous which led the theory of gravity of Newton. But I am also quite interested in quantification of Tycho. The accuracy of his data were within 1 arc-minute if referred by fixed stars, within 2 arc-minute in usual and within 4 arc-minute on the location of planets. It was so accurate when compared with the case of Copernicus, who was satisfied if his theory agreed with data in 10 arc-minute.

European seems to have tradition to respect to accumulate piles of numbers since those days. In the case of Japanese, we might prefer composing a poem for admiring its beautyof Mars or holding the tea ceremony under the sky. There is still tendency for Japanese to feel quantification to be less humanity, though it is a key step to do Physics.

こんにちは、トニーさん。「地球における日本」にコメントしてくれて有難う。
ええ、そうですね、古代ギリシアや古代エジプト文明などからの影響はとても重要ですね。
今回は物理学を進める上で必要となる2つの段階について触れようと思います。それは、

1) 数量化(データベース化)
2) 抽象化(法則化)

の2段階です。

16世紀、デンマークのチコ・ブラーエはなんと、16年間も火星の動きを詳しくノートに記録
しました。そのデータを解析して、ヨハネス・ケプラーは有名な「惑星運動に関する3つの
法則」を導きました。

チコの残した膨大な数字の羅列から法則を導きだした、このケプラーの洞察には驚くべきも
のがあり、その後、この3法則を説明するために、ニュートンの重力理論が生まれ近代物理
学の創始となっていきます。でも、私としては、そのきっかけとなったチコ・ブラーエの行
った自然現象の「数値化」の重要性に目を向けたいと思います。チコ・ブラーエの観測は恒
星を基準に測定した時は角度にして1分の誤差、通常は2分、惑星の位置に関しては4分とい
った高精度なものでした。コペルニクスが10分の精度での一致で満足していたのにくらべ、
各段の精度を誇っています。しかもその観測は裸眼だったのです。

ヨーロッパでは、そのころから「数値化」の重要性を認識していたことと思います。日本なら
さしずめ、火星を題材に俳句をひねるか、お茶会を開いて眺めるといったことでしょう。まだ
まだ日本では、「数値化」とか「数字の列」とかを人間味がないと敬遠する向きがあります。
でも、この数値化こそが、物理学にとって重要なステップなんです。

Share

Japan on the globe

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Welcome to my page!!

I hope you will enjoy reading the life of a Japanese physicist.
map4I put the map of the world. Can you find Japan? I think people from Euope and from the U.S.A.  have strange feeling with this map, because the view is so different from them. The Pacific Ocean is drawn in the center of the map! This is an ordinary map to be used in Japan. As you see, Japan is located in the so called far-east region on the globe.

Japan is one of the first countries to get morning in the world. In the 7th century, we already recognized Japan was the country rising of the sun and the big country China beyond the western sea was one of sunset. The emperor in China disliked much this expression, of cource. We call our country ‘Nihon’ in Japanese, of which literal meaning is ‘rising of the sun’. I think Japan has originated with ‘Nihon’ (-> ‘Nippon’ -> ‘Jippon’ ->Jepang’ ->’Japan’).

Anyway, Japan has such a long history because we are located at the edge and also enough isolated from the continent by the sea.  Various culture were introduced through Korea and China, for example, Chinese characters and Buddhism, so on. Simultaneously, thanks to this location, we could easily close our country to block the effect out from other countries and to grow up our own culture. The last opening of our country was the end of ‘Shougun(Edo)’ era in 19th century after 260 years closing. Japanese liked to follow the culture of Europe as soon as possible. Physics was also introduced at that time.

In Shougun era, Japanese already had skill of astronomical observation and made a map of Japan in very precise accuracy. But such a concept of the motion of equation was introduced just 150 years ago. Our Japanese is still very young on physics, when we compare with the introduction of Buddhism in the 6th century. On the other hand, if Galileo Galilei is considered as one of fathers of the modern physics, Europe has more than 300-year-old history. I am very interested in why physics was born in Europe.

ようこそ!これから日本の物理学者の日常をつづっていきますね。

まず世界地図を載せてみました。どこが日本かわかります?きっと、ヨーロッパやアメリカの人は
この地図を見て奇妙に思うことでしょう。というのも、この地図では太平洋が地図の真ん中にきてい
ますから。これが日本でふつう使われている地図です。ご存じのように、日本は地球の
「極東」と呼ばれる地域にありますが、これは欧米の地図では、本当に右端の東の端っこに描かれて
いるからですね。

日本は世界の中で最初に朝を迎える国の一つです。既に7世紀のころに、日本人は自分の国が
「日出る国」ということを知っていて、日本海の向こうの中国のことを「日の没する国」と呼ん
だりしていました。もちろん中国の皇帝はこの呼び方をきらいました。英語では日本をJapanと呼
びますが、これは、「ニホン」→「ニッポン」→「ジッポン(日本の中国語読み)→「ジパング」
→「ジャパン」になったという説があります。

まあ、ともかく日本がこれだけ長い歴史を保てた理由には、東の端で、大陸からも海で十分に離れ
ていたという地の利が大きかったと思います。漢字や仏教や、ものつくりなど多くの文化・文明が
韓国や中国を通してやってきたわけですが、地の利のおかげで簡単に国を閉ざすことができ、独自
の文化を育むことができたわけです。最後に国を開いたのは、260年間国を閉ざした後の、19世紀終わ
りの「将軍の時代(江戸時代)」の最後でした。国を開いたのち、日本人は欧米の文明をはやく取
り込もうとし、物理学もその一環として入ってきました。

既に江戸時代には、天文観測の十分な技術や、精巧な日本地図をつくるということができましたが、
運動方程式のような概念は150年前にようやく知ることになったのです。仏教が6世紀に導入されたの
と比べて、物理学に取り組んだ年月はまだまだです。一方、ガリレオ・ガリレイを近代物理学の父の
一人と考えたとき、ヨーロッパは物理学に取り組んで、300年となっています。ヨーロッパでなぜ物理
学が生まれたのかにとても興味があります。

Share