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Adam Yurkewicz

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Adam Yurkewicz

I am a postdoc for SUNY Stony Brook, working on the ATLAS experiment at CERN, and living in nearby France. I'm helping commission the Liquid Argon Calorimeter and writing and testing part of the reconstruction software dealing with Missing ET. This means that most of my time is spent analyzing data and writing software.

I was born and raised in Queens, New York, an experience that prepared me well for working in a field with such a diverse group of people as particle physicists. As I was good at math and asked my parents a lot of "how does that work?" questions, I was urged to study engineering, which I planned to do when I enrolled at Binghamton University in 1994. For some reason the courses didn't sound all that inviting when it came time to enroll, so I took everything but math and physics courses during my freshman year. After taking freshman physics my second year, I decided to take one more course on Modern Physics my junior year, and got hooked on crazy-sounding particles like quarks, and bizarre-sounding ideas like those explained in "QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter" by Richard Feynman.

Adam Yurkewicz

In 1998, I decided to go to graduate school at Michigan State University so that I could work at Fermilab, the home of the world's highest-energy particle accelerator. I joined the DØ Experiment and worked at Fermilab, near Chicago, Illinois from 2000 to 2006. As a graduate student on DØ I wrote my dissertation on a search for supersymmetric particles, and as a postdoc for Stony Brook I worked with the DØ Liquid Argon Calorimeter. I joined the ATLAS experiment in 2006 and moved to France that September, where I expect to stay until 2009.

This is a great time to be at CERN, with LHC turn-on and first data taking imminent, and I'll do my best to convey the excitement of this year's events in this blog.