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Nathan Jurik

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I'm a graduate student from Syracuse University working on the LHCb experiment, and I am currently stationed at CERN. Since starting my graduate studies, I have been researching decays of charmed B mesons, which consist of a bottom anti-quark and a charm quark. These particles hold the status of the heaviest known meson composed of two quarks with different flavour. Studying them will aid in the understanding of heavy quark dynamics. If you happen to be interested in these particles, it is quite an exciting time. They were first observed at the Tevatron roughly 15 years ago, but not until the LHC began producing data have physicists been able to study their properties in detail and put the wide array of theoretical predictions to the test.

I grew up in the Chicago area and lived in Illinois for the large majority of my life. There wasn't really a particular moment when I realized I wanted to be a physicist. Throughout my childhood, I was interested in a wide range of fields in science. I actually started off my undergraduate education studying engineering, and, as is standard, my first encounter with physics was through classical mechanics. I liked it because things just seemed to make sense. Then I learned some introductory quantum physics, and things didn't really make sense anymore. I just had to try to learn more to get it to make sense. And then I was hooked. In brief, that's the story of how I became a physicist--a part of the never-ending struggle to get things to make sense.

In my free time I like to relax with friends, read, run and do other outdoors activities. And if it counts as a hobby, catching up on sleep is pretty great too.