• John
  • Felde
  • University of Maryland
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • USLHC
  • USLHC
  • USA

  • James
  • Doherty
  • Open University
  • United Kingdom

Latest Posts

  • Andrea
  • Signori
  • Nikhef
  • Netherlands

Latest Posts

  • CERN
  • Geneva
  • Switzerland

Latest Posts

  • Aidan
  • Randle-Conde
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • Belgium

Latest Posts

  • TRIUMF
  • Vancouver, BC
  • Canada

Latest Posts

  • Laura
  • Gladstone
  • MIT
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Steven
  • Goldfarb
  • University of Michigan

Latest Posts

  • Fermilab
  • Batavia, IL
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Seth
  • Zenz
  • Imperial College London
  • UK

Latest Posts

  • Nhan
  • Tran
  • Fermilab
  • USA

Latest Posts

  • Alex
  • Millar
  • University of Melbourne
  • Australia

Latest Posts

  • Ken
  • Bloom
  • USLHC
  • USA

Latest Posts

Rob Knoops

View Blog

Rob Knoops

I am a PhD. student in theoretical physics at the University of Leuven, Belgium. I have been doing research on string theory and supergravity at CERN since 2011.

For my research I am mainly interested in taking complicated theories such as string theory and trying to connect these theories to the real world. For example, string theory starts from the assumption that the most fundamental objects in nature are very little strings. The different kinds of particles we know are then associated with the different vibration modes of the strings, a bit like the different notes on a guitar.

String theory on the other hand, is only consistent if the universe consists of 10 (or 11, depending on whom you ask) dimensions. My research then is to think about the extra dimensions in space and the effect they might have on several constants in nature like the cosmological constant.

I have studied my physics bachelor's at a very small Belgian university called Hasselt University, where we graduated with a class of 6. I then moved to Leuven to get a master in theoretical physics. Although my research is very, very theoretical, I am also very interested in the experimental side of physics. While I leave the technical details to more experimentally talented people, I am very much interested in their progress. For this reason, it is an incredible opportunity to do my PhD so close to the source, namely CERN.

Except for physics, which is indeed more than a job for me, I spend my free time mainly doing sports and organising social events. The sports I participate in vary from handball to padel tennis in summer and snowboarding in winter.