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Tony Hartin

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Tony Hartin

Originally I am from Melbourne, Australia. From an early age my father influenced me to be a pilot; though this was always going to be problematic, considering I wore glasses from the age of 7. Trainee pilots needed to study science though, so I could at least do that. Perhaps I would have ended up in science in any case without prompting - I absolutely loved science programs and documentaries on tv, and I'm sure I annoyed my family with constantly wanting to watch them!

Once I started university and learnt about the mysteries of quantum mechanics, I became hooked on physics. I still haven’t gotten my head around that subject, though I persevere! I found university a fascinating place - I got distracted from physics by history, politics and philosophy more than once. I came to the conclusion that I wanted a job where I could do research all the time and that research should be about "finding stuff out". I consider myself incredibly lucky to have such a job now.

I did my undergraduate years at Monash University in Australia and my PhD in Quantum Electrodynamics at the University of London. I worked within the world wide research effort on the International Linear Collider at London Uni and at the John Adams Institute in Oxford University. In July last year I came to DESY, Hamburg where I still work on the ILC in diverse topics such as polarimetry, supersymmetry, detector background studies and intense field QED.

I love travel and exploring new places and new ideas - and my job gives me much opportunity to do all three. I wish I had four lives to do justice to all the research topics that keep cropping up. I particularly wish I had more time to read my way through books - though long aeroplane trips do give me that opportunity. Generally though, I snatch as much information from the internet as I can during coffee and lunch breaks. I try to keep fit as much as possible since we humans were not really designed for 8 hours of deskwork a day! I'm looking forward to the opportunity to blog here at Quantum Diaries.